POLITICO Playbook: The Jan. 6 committee drama gets serious Presented by Steven Bannon indicated Friday he will not comply with the House Jan. 6 committee's subpoena. | Alex Wong/Getty Images DRIVING THE DAY BREAKING OVERNIGHT — Texas’ abortion ban is back in effect after the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals struck down a lower court ruling that had temporarily blocked its enforcement. The DOJ has until Tuesday to respond in court. More from KUT in Austin JAN. 6 INVESTIGATION STEAMROLLS FORWARD — Over the last 24 hours, we’ve seen major developments in the ongoing investigation into the pro-Trump Jan. 6 riots that sought to overthrow democracy in America. 1) Executive privilege waived: “President JOE BIDEN will not invoke executive privilege to shield an initial set of records from DONALD TRUMP’s White House that's being sought by congressional investigators probing the Jan. 6 Capitol attack,” report Nicholas Wu, Kyle Cheney, Betsy Woodruff Swan and Meridith McGraw. — What comes next: Trump has 30 days to challenge the decision in court, after which time, the National Archives will release the documents to the Jan. 6 panel. The former president is already asserting privilege over 45 specific documents requested from the committee, and indicated in a letter that he wants to bar the release of additional documents “potentially numbering in the millions.” 2) Committee subpoenas hit deadlines: The first wave of high-profile subpoenas from the Jan. 6 committee have been served, and not all of the subjects are cooperating, as Nicholas, Kyle, Betsy and Meridith detail: STEVE BANNON claims that Trump’s invocation of executive privilege means that he doesn’t have to participate. (That strikes legal experts as dubious, seeing as at the time of the 2020 election, Bannon hadn’t worked in the White House for several years.) claims that Trump’s invocation of executive privilege means that he doesn’t have to participate. (That strikes legal experts as dubious, seeing as at the time of the 2020 election, Bannon hadn’t worked in the White House for several years.) MARK MEADOWS is “engaging with the Select Committee,” per a statement from the panel. is “engaging with the Select Committee,” per a statement from the panel. KASH PATEL issued a statement Friday confirming that he "responded to the subpoena in a timely manner” and is engaging with the committee. issued a statement Friday confirming that he "responded to the subpoena in a timely manner” and is engaging with the committee. DAN SCAVINO was officially served with his subpoena on Friday. — What comes next: In a statement from Jan. 6 Committee Chair BENNIE THOMPSON (D-Miss.) and Vice Chair LIZ CHENEY (R-Wyo.), the panel said it “will not allow any witness to defy a lawful subpoena or attempt to run out the clock, and we will swiftly consider advancing a criminal contempt of Congress referral.” If they’re serious, a criminal referral would require a full floor vote in the House. More from NYT’s Maggie Haberman and Luke Broadwater — Something to watch: “Congress’ Jan. 6 investigators face an inevitable reckoning with their GOP colleagues,” by Kyle Cheney and Olivia Beavers 3) Major new allegations from a Capitol Police whistleblower: “A former high-ranking Capitol Police official with knowledge of the department’s response to the Jan. 6 attack has sent congressional leaders a scathing letter accusing two of its senior leaders [acting chief SEAN GALLAGHER and assistant chief YOGANANDA PITTMAN] of mishandling intelligence and failing to respond properly during the riot,” scoop Daniel Lippman and Betsy Woodruff Swan. — What the whistleblower claims: (1) Gallagher and Pittman deliberately chose not to help officers under attack on Jan. 6, (2) the pair had enough intelligence before the riot to justify demanding National Guard reinforcements but didn’t share their intel and instead approved an inadequate security plan, (3) Pittman lied to Congress about the intel the Capitol Police had, and (4) leaders in Congress “purposefully failed” to tell the truth about the Capitol Police’s actions. Good Saturday morning. Thanks for reading Playbook. Drop us a line: Rachael Bade, Eugene Daniels, Ryan Lizza, Tara Palmeri. A message from Amazon: All Amazon employees earn at least $15 an hour—and more in areas where the cost of living is higher. In fact, our roles in fulfillment and transportation offer an average of more than $18 an hour. We invest in employee career growth and offer full-time employees benefits like health care on day one, and fully paid family leave. Learn more about Amazon’s commitment to their employees. RECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES — Two important stories this morning on the reconciliation package and Democrats’ internal squabbles over what to include. — SENATE MODERATES VS. HOUSE MODERATES: Don’t say we didn’t warn you. On Friday, we highlighted a report from Mother Jones’ Kara Voght on the brewing fight between moderate Dems in the Senate vs. modera . . . read the full article here.